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Op. 16b - Three Conversations

for Two Saxophones

(2022)

I. Argumentatively
II. Concurringly
III. Colloqouy

Program Notes: The composition of my Three Conversations for Two Clarinets, B-Flat & Bass, respectively, began in 2009 and has continued through 2013 with regular revisions and refinements. The arrangement for Soprano and Baritone saxophones was completed was completed in 22022. The Three Conversations were initially conceived as pseudo-Invention style pieces whose imitative and ‘call and response’ style of composition suggested, to me, a sort of conversation amongst the two voices. This idea developed and transformed into real life conversational scenarios. The first movement, Argumentatively, is an agitated, unstable and dissonant web of contrapuntal techniques built on tri-tones. The angular and chromatic riffs are constantly falling on top of one another with very little repose, pushing each instrument to the extremes of their range. Concurringly, the second movement, is a momentary reprieve from the intensity of the preceding conversation. It begins with a mournful basso ostinato that creates a more cooperative dialogue amongst the two clarinets and builds a foundation upon which they can ‘concur’ with one another, though not without their moments of contention. Colloquy, or simply a dialogue or exchange, is loosely a culmination of the previous two movements – not thematically, but in its use of the invention, basso ostinato and variation. In an extended arch form (ABCB1AC1A1) it begins with a recurring off-kilter rhythm played by the bass clarinet upon which an agitated theme rests (A). It quickly builds and dissolves into an arabesque (B) that features both instruments in supporting and authoritative roles which transforms into a playful allegro animato (C). The arabesque (B1) deftly reappears in a developed form that multiplies into a klezmer-infused frenzy that decelerates into the opening theme (A). A more rhythmically driving animato (C1) section returns with tinges of the arabesques’ Hebraic influence which ushers in a final, definitive and bombastic return of the theme (A1).

(2009/2013/2022)

Performance History:

 

George N. Gianopoulos

composer